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How the UNICHAR() DAX Function Enhances Power BI Reports

The UNICHAR() DAX function is a text function that takes a numerical Unicode value and displays its associated character. For example, UNICHAR(128515) will display as:

90% of the information the human brain processes is visual and we process images up to 60,000 times faster than text, so it makes perfect sense to use icons where possible to enhance reports. This scarcely used DAX function opens-up that option.

The below stacked column chart uses Unicode emoticons to enhance the readability of the ‘Genre’ axis labels.

So, how do we achieve this?

To produce this you will need to edit the query. In the ‘Data’ view, right click the relevant table and select “Edit Query”

First, duplicate the existing column you want Unicode characters for (genre in this case). Then use the ‘Replace Values’ option to substitute in the relevant Unicode numbers for each genre.

(this can be hidden from the report view as it contains nothing meaningful).

Next, create a second calculated column that uses a simple measure:

IconColumn = (UNICHAR(UnicodeNumberColumn))

This new ‘Icon’ column can now be used in reports the same way as any other text column.

Note how in the stacked column chart above, the original names have been included, this is good practice for two main reasons. One is clarity, a clown denotes comedy to most users, but could indicate horror to others, including the label removes the ambiguity.

The other reason is due to possible compatibility issues. It is worth pointing out here that the Unicode characters will only display when the character exists in the chosen font. In most cases this will be fine, especially for emoji characters, but just in case there are display issues it is worth including the full label.

Staying with the movie topic, the below chart shows movie ratings both numerically and visually created by a custom measure:

Stars = REPT(UNICHAR(11088), AVERAGE('IMDB 1000'[10 Star Rating]))

A measure that uses the UNICHAR() function will always be a text field and as such, normal formatting applies, in the example above we can set colours to be gold on a black background.

The previous examples do help readability but don’t really add anything meaningful to the report. The below table shows that the UNICHAR() function can add worthwhile content with customisable KPIs by combining it with conditional formatting.

There are 143,859 Unicode characters available, everything from emojis, symbols, shapes and braille patterns to dice and playing cards. Whether you want to offer further insight into your data, enhance the user experience or simply create something sublimely ridiculous, with so many icons at your fingertips, the possibilities are only limited by your imagination.

Further information on the UNICHAR() function can be found here: UNICHAR function (DAX) – DAX | Microsoft Docs
A list of Unicode characters and their respective numerical values can be found here: Huge List of Unicode Characters

One comment on “How the UNICHAR() DAX Function Enhances Power BI Reports

  1. Garrydene Greenly on said:

    That is amazing. Thank you so posting this

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The Frog Blog

Team Purple Frog specialise in designing and implementing Microsoft Data Analytics solutions, including Data Warehouses, Cubes, SQL Server, SSIS, ADF, SSAS, Power BI, MDX, DAX, Machine Learning and more.

This is a collection of thoughts, ramblings and ideas that we think would be useful to share.

Authors:

Alex Whittles
(MVP)
Reiss McSporran
Jeet Kainth
Jon Fletcher
Nick Edwards
Joe Billingham
Microsoft Gold Partner

Data Platform MVP

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