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Monthly Archives: December 2020

Azure Analysis Services Cube Backup

This blog is a quick guide on how to back up an Azure Analysis Services cube using PowerShell. The PowerShell is used in a runbook inside an Automation account in Azure to automate the backup process. A pre-requisite for this is to configure the backup storage settings, this details the location of the backups.

Two parameters are passed into the runbook (shown below), where AnalysisServerName is the server name for the analysis services cube and AutomationCredentialName is the name of the credential for the Automation account in Azure.

The following variable is used to store the current date, obtained using the Get-Date cmdlet. This will be used as part of the backup name.

The command Get-AzureAutomationCredential is used to get the credentials for the Automation account provided, in this case it is one of the parameters provided for the runbook. The result is saved to a variable that will be used as a parameter for the backup command.

And finally, the backup command completes the backup of the analysis services cube to a file. Several parameters are used in this command: -BackupFile is the name given to the backup file, -Name is the name of the cube being backed up, -Server is the server name (passed in as a parameter), -Credential is the credentials obtained in the previous step, and -ApplyCompression enables the backup with compression.

I hope you have found this useful!

ADF Switch Activity – A neat solution for nested IFs.

Whilst carrying out some work for a client using Azure Data Factory I was presented with the challenge of triggering different activities depending on the result of a stored procedure.

In fact the challenge posed was to…

  • Execute ‘Copy A’ activity if the result of a stored procedure returned (A),
  • Execute ‘Copy B’ activity if the result of a stored procedure returned (B),
  • Execute ‘Copy C’ activity if the result of a stored procedure returned (C)
  • Finally execute an error stored procedure if the result of the stored procedure returned (D).

Prior to the switch statement I could achieve this using 4 ‘IF’ activities connected to a lookup activity as shown in the snip below using my ‘Wait’ example pipeline.

However a neater solution is to use the ‘Switch’ activity to do this work instead. I’ll now jump straight into a worked example to show you how I achieved this.

I created a demo.RandomNumberGenerator stored procedure in our Purple Frog Demo database which declares a variable and sets it equal to a random number between 1 and 4. The stored procedure then uses this variable in a case statement to return a string. So if the @randomnumber variable returns 1 the case statement returns ‘Wait 1 Minute’.

I then used a lookup activity in ADF to return the result of this stored procedure which I then used to ‘feed’ my ‘Switch’ activity.

When I preview this lookup activity it just returns the result of the stored procedure. When this is run time and time again it just returns a random ‘ADFAction’ as named in my case statement generated by my rand() SQL function. So in the scenario above it returned an action of ‘Wait 1 Minute’. If I were to preview the stored procedure again it might return ‘Wait 4 Minutes’ instead.

I can then connect my switch activity to this lookup activity using the ‘success’ green output connector.

I now need to add some dynamic content to refer to the output of my lookup activity. I don’t need to create dynamic nested IF content to say if my stored procedure equals ‘Wait 1 Minute’ then do this, if my stored procedure equals ‘Wait 2 Minutes’ then do this… all I need to do is refer to the output of the connected lookup activity ‘Random Number Lookup Activity’.

So in my example this is simply just @activity(‘Random Number Lookup Activity’).output.firstrow.adfaction. ADF will then match the output of the stored procedure to the case statements I provide it. The default activity is just a set of activities that are executed when the expression evaluation isn’t satisfied. I.e. the output of my the stored procedure doesn’t match any of the case statements I provide it.

In the snip below I have provided 4 case statements which match all of the possible outputs from my stored procedure. Essentially there isn’t any need for default activity as my stored procedure will always return 1 of 4 results but it’s useful to know for future reference.

Within each case statement there is an activity for which I would like ADF to perform if it matches the result of my stored procedure. In my example these are just ‘Wait’ activities. So if the stored procedure returns ‘Wait 1 Minute’ I’ve put a ‘Wait’ activity within the case statement to wait 1 minute (or 60 seconds).

When I first ran this pipeline in debug mode I could see that the output of the stored procedure was ‘Wait 2 Minutes’. The switch activity then matched this to the case statements I provided and performed the activity within the ‘Wait 2 Minutes’ case statement and triggered my ‘Wait 2 Minutes’ activity.

When I debugged another run my stored procedure returned ‘Wait 4 Minutes’. The switch activity then executed my ‘Wait 4 Minutes’ activity. Perfect!

So it’s pretty much as simple that!

I hope this helps all you ADF’ers out there!

Tabular Cube Processing Report

I have created a Power BI report which provides detail on the state of processing in a Tabular Cube.
The report uses the cube’s dynamic management views to provide information about the cube’s partitions.

To use the tabular cube processing report, you need to insert the following information:

  • Server
  • Database (Cube Name)

Once entered and assuming the connection is fine you need to accept some native queries. These statements are select statements and will not alter the cube. That should give you a report similar to the one below, I have used an adventure works tabular model as an example.

Click here to download the report

This report is inspired by one I found for general tabular cube documentation by Data Savvy, which I highly recommend. That report includes information on: tables, columns, relationships, measure and security:

Click here to view tabular cube documentation blog post

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The Frog Blog

Team Purple Frog specialise in designing and implementing Microsoft Data Analytics solutions, including Data Warehouses, Cubes, SQL Server, SSIS, ADF, SSAS, Power BI, MDX, DAX, Machine Learning and more.

This is a collection of thoughts, ramblings and ideas that we think would be useful to share.

Authors:

Alex Whittles
(MVP)
Reiss McSporran
Jeet Kainth
Jon Fletcher
Nick Edwards
Joe Billingham
Microsoft Gold Partner

Data Platform MVP

Power BI Sentinel
Frog Blog Out
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