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SSRS Report Performance monitoring

Today’s Frog-Blog top-tips are quite simple ones, but ones that I always find very useful. SSRS Report Performance monitoring.

Once you start to build up a few Reporting Services reports, you need to find out how they’re performing, whether any particular reports are causing the server problems and even which users are running which reports. The following set of queries should point you in the right direction. They should all be run against the ReportServer database.

The 20 most recently run reports

 SELECT TOP 20 C.Path, C.Name, EL.UserName, EL.Status, EL.TimeStart, 
     EL.[RowCount], EL.ByteCount, 
    (EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)/1000 AS TotalSeconds, 
     EL.TimeDataRetrieval, EL.TimeProcessing, EL.TimeRendering 
   FROM ExecutionLog EL 
    INNER JOIN Catalog C ON EL.ReportID = C.ItemID 
   ORDER BY TimeStart DESC 

The slowest reports (in the last 28 days)

 SELECT TOP 10 C.Path, C.Name, Count(*) AS ReportsRun, 
   AVG((EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)) 
                                            AS AverageProcessingTime, 
   Max((EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)) 
                                            AS MaximumProcessingTime, 
   Min((EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)) 
                                            AS MinimumProcessingTime 
 FROM ExecutionLog EL 
   INNER JOIN Catalog C ON EL.ReportID = C.ItemID 
 WHERE EL.TimeStart>Datediff(d,GetDate(),-28) 
 GROUP BY C.Path,C.Name 
 ORDER BY AVG((EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)) DESC 

The most active users

 SELECT TOP 10 EL.UserName, Count(*) AS ReportsRun, 
   Count(DISTINCT C.[Path]) AS DistinctReportsRun 
  FROM ExecutionLog EL 
    INNER JOIN Catalog C ON EL.ReportID = C.ItemID 
  WHERE EL.TimeStart>Datediff(d,GetDate(),-28) 
  GROUP BY EL.UserName 
  ORDER BY Count(*) DESC 

The most popular reports

 SELECT TOP 10 C.Path, C.Name, Count(*) AS ReportsRun, 
   AVG((EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)) 
                                            AS AverageProcessingTime, 
   Max((EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)) 
                                            AS MaximumProcessingTime, 
   Min((EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)) 
                                            AS MinimumProcessingTime 
  FROM ExecutionLog EL 
   INNER JOIN Catalog C ON EL.ReportID = C.ItemID 
  WHERE EL.TimeStart>Datediff(d,GetDate(),-28) 
  GROUP BY C.Path, C.Name 
  ORDER BY Count(*) DESC 

Failed Reports

 SELECT TOP 20 C.Path, C.Name, EL.UserName, EL.Status, EL.TimeStart, 
   EL.[RowCount], EL.ByteCount, 
   (EL.TimeDataRetrieval + EL.TimeProcessing + EL.TimeRendering)/1000 AS TotalSeconds, 
   EL.TimeDataRetrieval, EL.TimeProcessing, EL.TimeRendering 
  FROM ExecutionLog EL 
   INNER JOIN Catalog C ON EL.ReportID = C.ItemID 
  WHERE EL.Status <> 'rsSuccess' 
  ORDER BY TimeStart DESC 

There are countless other variations, but this should be enough to get you going.

[Update: 05/09/2011 – Thanks to Jonathan [Twitter|Website] for pointing out a typo!]

6 Responses to SSRS Report Performance monitoring

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The Frog Blog

Team Purple Frog specialise in designing and implementing Microsoft Data Analytics solutions, including Data Warehouses, Cubes, SQL Server, SSIS, ADF, SSAS, Power BI, MDX, DAX, Machine Learning and more.

This is a collection of thoughts, ramblings and ideas that we think would be useful to share.

Authors:

Alex Whittles
(MVP)
Reiss McSporran
Jeet Kainth
Jon Fletcher
Nick Edwards

Data Platform MVP

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